Monday, 18 December 2017

Excel - Discovering Dependent Workbooks






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Excel - Duplicate Workbooks Opening



Clair has a problem with one of her Excel workbooks: When she opens it, Excel always "replicates" the workbook. Once opened, Clair reports that she has two workbooks showing in the task bar. Both contain the proper workbook name, but one is followed by a 1 and the other followed by a 2.
Believe it or not, this problem is actually a feature of Excel. What you are seeing is two windows, both open on the same workbook. Excel allows you to create multiple windows on the same workbook by displaying the View tab of the ribbon and clicking the New Window tool. Each new window has the same name, except they have a suffix consisting of a colon and a number that indicates the window number (1, 2, 3, etc.).
When you save a workbook that has multiple windows, the next time you open the workbook it will display the same number of windows. If you want to get rid of some of the windows, you need to close them. You do this by clicking the Close Window control. (This is the X at the upper-right corner of the worksheet, not at the upper-right of the program window. It is black, not red, although it should be just below the red X. If you hover the mouse pointer over it, you'll see the ToolTip "Close Window" appear.)
Once you close any windows you don't want, save the workbook again. The next time you open it, you should see only a single window.

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Excel - Excel Not Responding




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Excel - Making Changes in a Group of Workbooks







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Excel - Forcing a Workbook to Close after Inactivity




These three routines are fairly straightforward. The first two respectively turn on the timer and turn it off. Note that these routines utilize the DownTime variable, which is declared outside of any of the routines. In this way its contents can be utilized in multiple routines.
The third routine, ShutDown, is the one that actually closes the workbook. It is only invoked if the OnTime method expires, at the end of an hour. It closes the workbook without saving any changes that may have been made.
The next routines (there are four of them) need to be added to the ThisWorkbook object. Open the VBA Editor and double-click on the ThisWorkbook object in the Project Explorer. In the code window that Excel opens, place these routines:








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Saturday, 16 December 2017

Excel - Changing Links


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Excel - Comparing Workbooks




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Excel - Closing a Read-Only Workbook

Steve has a read-only workbook that multiple users can access. They can modify cells but not save their work. On exiting the workbook, Steve wants Excel to just close without informing the user that it is read-only and giving them the option of saving a copy.
This is best accomplished by using a macro to modify the Saved flag in the workbook, just before closing. This flag indicates, internally, whether a workbook needs saving or not. If the flag is False, then Excel knows that the workbook has not been saved (changes have been made without saving). If your macro sets the flag to True, then Excel will close directly because it thinks that all the changes have been saved.
Here's what the macro should look like, at its simplest:



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Excel - Accessing a Problem Shared Workbook



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Excel - Creating a Workbook Clone




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Friday, 15 December 2017

Excel - Condensing Multiple Worksheets Into One





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Excel - Sorting Text as Numbers

Steve has a worksheet that consists of three columns of data: Part Number, Quantity, and Length. Length is designated in inches, with a quotation mark to show it is in inches (such as 30", 54", or 100"). Steve needs to sort the data from shortest to longest length, but Excel sorts the lengths as text, such that 100" comes before 30". He wonders if there is a way to get Excel to sort the textual information as if it were numbers, so 30" correctly comes before 100", without getting rid of the quotation marks.
The short answer is that you can't do it, at least not directly. When you include the quote mark in the cell, Excel treats the entire cell as text and sorts it as such. And, as Steve noted, the text string 100" comes before 30" because 1 comes before 3 in a textual sort.
There are things you can do, however. For instance, if you use a formula to generate the values in your Length column, you could modify the formula so that it "front pads" the lengths with zeroes, as necessary. Using this approach you would not have lengths like 30", 54", or 100", but instead you would have 030", 054", and 100". As long as all the lengths used the same number of digits, the sorting will occur correctly.
You could also add a helper column to the right of the Length column and, in the helper column, place the numeric values of whatever is in the cell to the left. So, if your first data in in cell C2, in cell D2 (your helper column) you could enter the following:


The four quote marks are necessary as the second parameter of the SUBSTITUTE function in order to get rid of quote marks in C2. The result is that D2 contains the numeric value of whatever was in cell C2. Copy the formula down as far as necessary, and then use column D to do the sorting. After sorting you can even hide column D, if desired, or make it as narrow as you want.
Another approach that can work well if you have a limited number of lengths is to create a custom list and then use that list to do the sorting. Here's how to set up the custom list for your lengths:
  1. Display the Excel Options dialog box. (In Excel 2007 click the Office button and then click Excel Options. In Excel 2010 or later versions, display the File tab of the ribbon and then click Options.)
  2. If you are using Excel 2007, make sure Popular is selected at the left of the dialog box. If you are using Excel 2010 or a later version, click Advanced and then scroll toward the end of the options until you see the General area.
  3. Click Edit Custom Lists. Excel displays the Custom Lists dialog box and hides the Excel Options dialog box. (See Figure 1.)









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Excel - Understanding Ascending and Descending Sorts





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Excel - Creating a Worksheet Copy by Default




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Excel - Sorting Dates and Times



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